Sunday, May 24, 2015

Flowers from Bread Natural and non toxic

I've been experimenting with homemade clays recently. This is one of my favorites. It is porcelain smooth, kind of like Fimo dough but without the baking and toxicity. Miniaturists and model railroad buffs have been using this clay for years.
Materials
six pieces of white bread (cut off crusts)
3 Tablespoons of white glue
a few drops of dishwashing liquid
food coloring
pin back (optional)
frame (optional)
Tools
wooden skewer
table knife
cookie rack
hot glue gun
nail polish (optional)
Put bread in a food processor and mix until crumbs. Add glue and dishwashing liquid. If the dough is dry, add more glue. Place dishwashing liquid on your hands and knead until dough is smooth and non sticky.

 Divide the dough into fourths and add a drop of food coloring to each section. Knead until the color is completely integrated. Add more color if greater intensity is desired, however the color gets darker when it dries. The dough can be placed in the refrigerator in baggies at this time or you can begin to create your flowers right away.


For the Poppy: flatten a small ball of blue and make indentations all around the circle with the back of a table knife. place a tiny ball of yellow in the middle. Roll and flatten 4 pea-sized red balls. Pinch to obtain irregular shaped petals. Make parallel indentations on each petal with the table knife. Combine the 4 petals together in the middle. Place the blue circle in the center.

 For the Calla Lilly: mix yellow and red doughs to form orange. Pinch a large pea-sized ball of orange into a long oval shape - wider at one end. Roll a small ball into a snake shape and place it in the middle of the orange oval, lengthwise. Roll the narrow end around the yellow snake, flairing out the wider end.
 For the long chartreuse leaves: mix yellow and green doughs. Roll a pea-sized ball into a cone shape and pinch to achieve the long leaf shape. Place the back of the knife in the middle and fold the leaf in half then allow it to fall open.

 For the rose: flatten and pinch 6 or more pea-sized balls until they are the thickness of paper. Roll one up to form the center. Wrap the other petals around the center, flairing the outer petal to form the rose. Just use the center and 2 or 3 petals to form a bud. Use the green dough to form the calyx.

 For the Hydrangea blossoms: Roll 4 tiny blue balls and one tiny yellow ball. Flatten the blue balls and press together in the middle. Cover with the yellow ball. These flowers are invaluable for fillers. Make lots.

 For leaves: pinch off a peas-sized green ball and roll into a cone shape. Flatten then use the back of the table knife to form veins.

 Place your flowers on a cookie rack. I placed some of the leaves over the handle of a wooden spoon to give them some dimension. Allow to dry for about 24 hours.

 There are so many things you can do with these flowers; fill a tiny terra cotta pot, cover a headband, or cover a napkin ring to name just a few. I decided to make a brooch by taking a plastic circle that I punched out of a milk jug and hot glueing the flowers to it.

 Gorgeous! Glue on a pin back and you are good to go.

If you paint your flowers with mod podge or a lacquer they will have  a lovely shine

thanks to can't stop making things for the tutorial

Old coffee table turned into a dog’s house



Thursday, May 21, 2015

Shabby birdbath



Start by glueing a terra cotta bottom to the pot with Elmer's, Tacky glue or any general craft glue. You can use tall or short pots, but the "Bath" needs to be a bit larger than what would fit the bottom of a pot. So, if you buy a 6" pot, then buy an 8" bottom tray. Make sense ?


 Next I mix up some paint. ( Acrylic ) I cant stand the hot, bright pinks they sell, so I always make my own by adding lots of white acrylic paint to the stores brand of pink. Brush on THREE coats, letting dry between each coat. I do not prime, or spray the pots first and you will see why next.





A Sweet n' Shabby Birdbath....................I like to use them to fill with potpourri, but they could be used as decorative soap holders as well as candle holders.

Start by glueing a terra cotta bottom to the pot with Elmer's, Tacky glue or any general craft glue. You can use tall or short pots, but the "Bath" needs to be a bit larger than what would fit the bottom of a pot. So, if you buy a 6" pot, then buy an 8" bottom tray. Make sense ?
Next I mix up some paint. ( Acrylic ) I cant stand the hot, bright pinks they sell, so I always make my own by adding lots of white acrylic paint to the stores brand of pink. Brush on THREE coats, letting dry between each coat. I do not prime, or spray the pots first and you will see why next.After my pot is dry, I shabby it up with 220 grit sand paper. When it is to your liking , use a wet cloth and wipe it down really well. At this point I seal it. You can do this with a brush on Acrylic Clear Sealer, or a clear spray paint ( water based ) I opt for the spray personally. When I was taught years ago to Tole Paint, I was told Brush strokes are a no-no. The smoother the painting the better, so that is how I paint today. However, since this is supposed to be chippy and shabby, get as sloppy as you want. It is a "Cant go wrong " Project :) :) :)

So now you want to gather your Doo Dads for embellishing. Every Bird bath needs a Bird. :) I always have wee Bird in a nest on the rim of the bath. You can use dried moss and roll it into a ball, hot glue it on and then "Fluff" it up a bit. I used tiny paper shred on mine. 

 So, Now you have your base to add the flowers. I added vintage lily of the valley, honeysuckle and vintage pink posies. To this I added new pink roses and pink forget me nots.

And Ta-Da !!! It is finished !! Easy Peasy, Right ?????


Thanks to Rhea for the great tutorial

Teapot pincushion GORGEOUS


Thanks to Sadie for the photos and tutorial

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

no churn ice cream YUM

 
 
 
 
Orange  No-Churn Ice Cream

Prep time
Total time
 
Ingredients  
 
           small bottle or tetra pack of orange juice (or any juice you prefer)
            2 cups heavy whipping cream
            can sweetened condensed milk
Instructions
  1. Put all ingredients in a blender, and blend approximately 1 minute until the consistency of whipped cream.
  2. Scrape out of blender into a dish, such as a bread loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap and freeze

Monday, May 11, 2015

Preserve Garlic in olive oil

450g local garlic
1 teaspoon fine sea sat
1 teaspoon unrefined raw sugar
apple cider vinegar
a few sprigs of thyme
1-2 dried  bay leaves
extra virgin olive oil

Place peeled  garlic, salt and sugar into a medium saucepan and over just enough apple cider vinegar to cover .
Bring to the boil and cook for 2-3 minutes or until garlic is just tender but still firm.
Drain well ad pat garlic dry with paper towel.
Pack into sterilised glass jars add herbs an top with extra virgin olive oil to cover completely.
Seal and store in for up to three months.




Spice it up! Why plants love cinnamon


1) Seedlings. The term dampening off  covers a range of diseases and that attack a seed/seedling either before or after germination and cause the seedling to die. They can be caused by several different fungus and soil conditions. A few years back I read that if you dust the soil with cinnamon it will prevent dampening off. I've been doing it since with great results! (this also get's rid of those little gnats that somehow appear around seedling trays)

 
2) Wild mushrooms. Nothing worse then having to waste a beautiful day pulling mushrooms from the mulch in my flower beds. Mushrooms are fungus though, and by dusting cinnamon all over the mulch it helps to control mushroom growth. 

3) Rooting hormone. Much cheaper then the chemical stuff they sell in the big box store and just as effective! Just apply cinnamon powder to the stem when you plant the cutting. 

4) Ant deterrent. Ants do not like cinnamon! Sprinkle it in your greenhouse or around your garden beds. It will not kill the ants, but they will stay away from it. Sprinkle it by your doors if ants are coming into your house. They really hate to cross a line of cinnamon!

5) Plant wounds. Overzealous pruning or a slip of the weed whacker and you'll have a plant with a wound that needs fixed up. Simply dust cinnamon on the wound to encourage healing and prevent fungal infection at the same time. 

6) House plants. Cinnamon get's rid of molds and mildew in house plants too. Simply sprinkle a bit of cinnamon on the soil. It will also get rid of gnats if you happen to have them buzzing around your house plants. These are the same gnats seedlings get, the cinnamon destroys the fungus they feed on and they will die.

Cinnamon also has some amazing health benefits

Sunday, May 10, 2015

DIY solar pyramids

These structures look pretty easy to make and the materials are readily available around the homestead too. If not, a quick run to your hardware store should do the trick.


Here’s What You’ll Need:

  • greenhouse plastic film
  • wood poles or supports
  • compost
  • straw mulch
Your plant has to be in the ground before you can erect the pyramid. Don’t forget to add compost and mulch. The structure itself is constructed exactly as in the picture above, four posts tied together and the plastic wrapped around.
He says once you put up the structure and initially water your plant you do not have to worry about watering the plant again.

Slow cooker Tapocia pudding

    Slow Cooker Light Almond Milk Tapioca Pudding {dairy-free} One would never guess this effortless recipe for classic Tapi...